View: India's Face-Off With China In Sikkim Is A Sign of The Future

View: India's Face-Off With China In Sikkim Is A Sign of The Future
View: India's Face-Off With China In Sikkim Is A Sign of The Future

In Kashmir, shells and bullets regularly fly back and forth across India's de facto border with Pakistan. Yet, although India's 4,000-kilometre border with China is similarly disputed, not a single shot has been fired in anger there for decades.

View: India's Face-Off With China In Sikkim Is A Sign of The Future
View: India's Face-Off With China In Sikkim Is A Sign of The Future

In Kashmir, shells and bullets regularly fly back and forth across India's de facto border with Pakistan. Yet, although India's 4,000-kilometre border with China is similarly disputed, not a single shot has been fired in anger there for decades. That may soon change: There are genuine fears in New Delhi that the long period of calm may not last. And whether it does or not, the latest standoff in the Himalayas is sure to change India.

A weeks-long confrontation on the shared border between China, India and tiny Bhutan -- the sort that barely makes the headlines outside the countries involved -- has lasted longer than usual, and neither side looks ready to back off. Troops have had shoving matches and now stare one another down from encampments just miles apart. Although previous confrontations have been quietly resolved, this time some Indian strategists believe China will soon be tempted to launch a limited punitive strike as a reminder of its military superiority.

Clashes between India and China don’t usually matter to the rest of the world. Even when the two countries fought a short and bitter border war in 1962, the world’s attention was fixated on the brewing nuclear crisis in Cuba. While Indians have never quite forgotten our humiliating loss in that war, China has rarely chosen to remind us of it. This time, however, the usual chest-beating from India’s hyper-patriotic news media has been matched by similar noises from over the border. The state-controlled People’s Daily even posted a bellicose editorial from 1962 on its Weibo account.

In Beijing, a few weeks ago, I got the clear impression from some Chinese policymakers and diplomats that they thought India was getting, well, a bit above itself. Unhappy about China’s big Belt and Road Initiative, India not only stayed away from President Xi Jinping's recent forum showcasing the project, but released a stinging denunciation of the principles underlying the grand infrastructure scheme. That same language found its way into the joint statement issued by U. S. President Donald Trump and Narendra Modi when the Indian prime minister visited Washington last month. And India has recently taken a harder line on Tibet and the border than it has in the past.

For leaders in Beijing, this behavior seems inexplicable. I was repeatedly asked whether India had forgotten that its economy is five times smaller than China’s. Perhaps, one got the impression, India needed to be shown its place.

The problem is that India does not quite know its place. This makes sense when one considers its vision of its past and its expectations of its future. Independent India inherited the Raj’s armies -- the peacekeepers of Asia and Africa -- and with them, the Raj’s self-image as dominant east of Aden. has always viewed itself as at least China’s equal in spite of the 1962 loss -- and even as its northern neighbour raced ahead economically. That was a minor setback, Indians feel; eventually we'll catch up, once we sort our messy politics out. And meantime, why not behave as if we already have?

For the first time, perhaps, a sense of disquiet about this assumption has crept in. Questions are being asked about whether India is, in fact, ready to play a bigger strategic role in the region. Defense spending has not kept pace with India’s economy; the government spends less, proportionally, on the military than it has at any point since 1962. Eurasia Group’s Ian Bremmer noted on Twitter recently that India is one of the very few countries spending more on infrastructure than defense. This is by design; Indian policymakers are convinced that a new highway strengthens the country more than another battalion would. They may be right, too.

But it’s unlikely India will sit quietly in a corner. This is a young country, and impatient. When a billion people have been led to expect that they are a great power, they will demand their government behave accordingly. And so, whether or not we can afford it, whether or not it makes a great deal of objective sense to outsiders, our democracy guarantees that we won’t do what Deng Xiaoping’s China did and “bide our time. ry time China appears to disregard or dismiss India’s capabilities -- actions which seem eminently rational in Beijing -- it merely hastens the day that India will step up and seek a bigger role, one that matches its self-image.

Earlier this week, Australia’s foreign minister pointed out the stakes in New Delhi. Military outlays in our region expanded by over 5. 5 percent in 2015-16, easily outpacing the one percent overall global increase in military spending," Julie Bishop noted. By 2020, combined military budgets in our region are forecast to exceed $600 billion. Now this is significant, given U. S. expenditure is currently at $611 billion and Europe is at $334 billion. And this is without India even seeking to live up to its conception of itself. The question for China soon won't be how the world manages its rise, but how well it manages India’s.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/388305-view-india-s-face-off-with-china-in-sikkim-is-a-sign-of-the-future

How China Cleverly Managed To Play Both Instigator And Victim In The Doklam Stand-Off

How China Cleverly Managed To Play Both Instigator And Victim In The Doklam Stand-Off
How China Cleverly Managed To Play Both Instigator And Victim In The Doklam Stand-Off

India has maintained a calm but firm stance, kept the temperature low on its side and sent signals it wants to sort the problem with dialogue.

Four weeks and running, the India-China standoff at Doklam shows no sign of ending.

How China Cleverly Managed To Play Both Instigator And Victim In The Doklam Stand-Off
How China Cleverly Managed To Play Both Instigator And Victim In The Doklam Stand-Off

India has maintained a calm but firm stance, kept the temperature low on its side and sent signals it wants to sort the problem with dialogue.

Four weeks and running, the India-China standoff at Doklam shows no sign of ending. Yes, this one near the borders of India, China and Bhutan seems different and more menacing. It is the first time that India has engaged China from a third country — a fact that seems to have shocked some layers of the Chinese establishment.

The message from China’s official, quasi-official and non-official sources is the same, the difference being the degree of belligerence: India is at fault, it must back down, withdraw its troops and let Bhutan and China sort out their boundary dispute. In other words, China should have the freedom to coerce a tiny country.

India has maintained a calm but firm stance, kept the temperature low on its side and sent signals it wants to sort the problem with dialogue. The reporting has been sane with none of the hyperbole coming out of various founts of the Chinese media machine. Thankfully, there has been no charge of the Indian TV brigade.

Outside experts have weighed in —deconstructing the developments with keen insights. Lapsed ones like 1962 Sino-Indian war scholar Neville Maxwell have also offered their predictable views based on realities frozen in the past. Interestingly, Maxwell’s diatribe came without any input from the Chinese. He was floundering for information from sources far from Beijing. The rest was bias.

The reasons for China forcing a boundary dispute front and centre are many. China under President Xi Jinping has flapped its wings all around: from the oceans to the Himalayas to test the resolve of targeted countries. This also happens to be an ‘election’ year in China — even though the winner of the game of thrones is already known.

The 19th Congress of the Chinese Communist Party is expected to anoint Xi for a second term. But he is manoeuvring to stay in power beyond the traditional 10 years. At least one prominent rival was put under investigation last week for — what else? party indiscipline. Xi could be around until 2027.

There was no pressing need for the current confrontation with India. But it is continuation of adversarial politics by other means. The mythology around the closed Chinese system is so exaggerated that Western experts step gingerly around its constant aggression, almost afraid to call China out as they do Russia.

The Chinese have cleverly managed to play both instigator and victim in the Doklam stand-off. Making a distinction between India and Bhutan, and treating them separately without any cognisance of the India-Bhutan Friendship Treaty, profits the Chinese. It allows Beijing to demand that India unilaterally vacate its positions on China’s terms. The Chinese also chose the time carefully.

Their road-building in Doklam came before Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s meeting with US President Donald Trump, and after his meeting with Xi in Astana on the margins of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) summit.

Earlier, border transgressions, such as the one in Depsang, occurred when Sino-Indian relations were relatively stable — or at least in better shape than they are now. Who bears primary blame for deterioration is a matter of judgement.

After Modi naïvely tried to establish a personal relationship with Xi and failed, the more innate parts of the BJP’s thinking on China appear to have crept in. his may have partly led India to ‘expose’ China on issues related to Pakistan: India’s entry into the Nuclear Suppliers’ Group (NSG) and efforts to get Pakistani terrorists on the UN sanctions list.

Acycle of action and reaction followed. The Chinese were apoplectic when the Dalai Lama visited Arunachal Pradesh. But why shouldn’t a religious leader travel freely in India? The list of hostile acts by the Chinese against India is long, starting with making Pakistan into a bigger nuisance than it already was by augmenting its nuclear and missile capabilities. They completed the circle by running the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor through territory claimed by India.

China’s ‘string of pearls’ strategy of systematically influencing India’s closest neighbours, its forays into the Indian Ocean and the constant border incursions despite management mechanisms laboriously put in place — Beijing has constantly tried to restrict India’s strategic space while slowly gobbling land bit by bit. oximity to the US is deemed suspect and destabilising for Asia. But China can seek a ‘new type of major power relations’ with Washington.

China can violate agreements it signed in the past by simply pleading it was ‘weak’ then, even though it has been courted by different blocs since the middle of the last century. ina has successfully kept the Association of South Asian Nations (Asean) divided for years, never allowing a consensus to emerge on a ‘code of conduct’ for settling disputes in the South China Sea.

In China’s worldview, no one has the same rights and privileges it does. Not for nothing does China call itself the Middle Kingdom. It’s not the middle between Left and Right, but the middle around which the world revolves. Those who know the language and Chinese characters say people often miss this nuance.

No one can predict how or when the current stand-off will end. But we know intimidation is a bully’s primary tactic. And if you are not intimidated, the bully normally backs off.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/388304-how-china-cleverly-managed-to-play-both-instigator-and-victim-in-the-doklam-stand-off

For Dialogue, Both India And China Must Withdraw Troops, Says Sushma Swaraj

For Dialogue, Both India And China Must Withdraw Troops, Says Sushma Swaraj
For Dialogue, Both India And China Must Withdraw Troops, Says Sushma Swaraj

For Dialogue, Both India And China Must Withdraw Troops, Says Sushma Swaraj
For Dialogue, Both India And China Must Withdraw Troops, Says Sushma Swaraj

India on Thursday claimed that it has wide-ranging international support on the ongoing border stand-off with China and that the international community feels that Beijing is aggressive towards a small country like Bhutan.

Foreign countries are with us. They feel that China is being aggressive with a small country like Bhutan. Bhutan has protested, including in writing. All the countries feel India’s stand is right and the law is with us," Sushma Swaraj said in the Rajya Sabha.

Incidentally, EU Parliament’s vicepresident recently questioned China’s encroachment policy in Dokalam and South China Sea region. ver the years, China has been trying to get closer and closer to where the tri-junction point ends. It has done things like repair roads, retar them…This time though, they came with bulldozers and construction equipment with the aim of breaching the point where the tri-junction ends. That is a threat to our security," Swaraj pointed out.

The minister accused China of unilaterally trying to change the status quo on the frontier with Bhutan and this has led to the stand-off between the Indian and Chinese armies.

While China was saying that India should withdraw its troops from Dokalam for negotiations to begin, "we are saying that if a dialogue is to be held, then both should withdraw (their troops)".

She mentioned that India had opposed China’s One Belt One Road (OBOR) project from the beginning. Later, briefing reporters, MEA spokesperson Gopal Baglay referred to India’s June 30 statement to reiterate that "India’s approach has been to find peaceful resolution of all matters concerning the border with China".

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/388303-for-dialogue-both-india-and-china-must-withdraw-troops-says-sushma-swaraj

Sikkim Standoff Should Not Threaten RCEP Deal: Chinese Media

Sikkim Standoff Should Not Threaten RCEP Deal: Chinese Media
Sikkim Standoff Should Not Threaten RCEP Deal: Chinese Media

Sikkim Standoff Should Not Threaten RCEP Deal: Chinese Media
Sikkim Standoff Should Not Threaten RCEP Deal: Chinese Media

The India-China border standoff should not be allowed to threaten a mega economic deal Asia-Pacific nations are trying to negotiate at a meeting in Hyderabad, an article in an official Chinese daily said today.

The comment was made by The Global Times, the mouthpiece of the Communist Party media group, which generally reflects the views of the ruling party. In recent days, the tabloid has been at the forefront of verbal allegations against India amid the tension between the two countries in the Sikkim sector.

Sixteen countries, accounting for about 27 per cent of global trade, are meeting in Hyderabad to discuss the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) that is aimed at liberalising trade and investment in the Asia-Pacific region.

The technical level talks for the RCEP began on July 18.

On July 24, the negotiations will formally start.

The meeting is happening under the shadow of the standoff between India and China - the two largest economies taking part in the talks. The standoff began over the construction of a road by China in Doklam area and India fears the road could be used to cut New Delhi's links with its northeastern states.

India has said it is ready for talks with China to end the tension but both sides should first withdraw their armies from the disputed area. We are saying that the matter can be resolved through talks, but both sides have to first take back their armies," External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj has said.

China and India are two prominent members of the group, but they face the task of preventing an escalation of their border tensions from becoming an obstacle to reaching trade agreements at the negotiating table," the article said.

China hopes that India can strive to control its actions, ensuring that the escalation of the border tensions does not endanger the atmosphere of cooperation for the RCEP," it said.

If India encourages the border tensions to thwart the free trade negotiations, China will fight back and spare no effort to safeguard its territorial sovereignty, which cannot be traded in any case," it said.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/388302-sikkim-standoff-should-not-threaten-rcep-deal-chinese-media

UNSC Sanctions Individuals, Entities Linked To ISIS, Al-Qaeda

UNSC Sanctions Individuals, Entities Linked To ISIS, Al-Qaeda
UNSC Sanctions Individuals, Entities Linked To ISIS, Al-Qaeda

The UN Security Council has unanimously adopted a resolution to impose sanction measures on two armed groups, two entities and four individuals linked to the Islamic State (IS) and Al Qaeda.

UNSC Sanctions Individuals, Entities Linked To ISIS, Al-Qaeda
UNSC Sanctions Individuals, Entities Linked To ISIS, Al-Qaeda

The UN Security Council has unanimously adopted a resolution to impose sanction measures on two armed groups, two entities and four individuals linked to the Islamic State (IS) and Al Qaeda.

Two armed groups are the Al Qaeda-linked Jund al Aqsa and the IS-linked Jaysh Khalid ibn al-Waleed, both fighting in Syria, reports Xinhua news agency.

Two money exchange businesses based in Syria -- Hanifa Money Exchange Office and Selselat al Thabab -- are believed to have financial relations with the terrorist groups and were put on the sanction list.

Muhammad Bahrum Naim Anggih Tamtomo, Ornaa Rochman, Murad Irakfievich Margoshvili and Malik Ruslanovich Barkhanoev were added to the list because of their participation in terrorist attacks associated with IS and Al Qaeda.

The sanction measures include asset freeze, a global travel ban and an arms embargo which prevents direct or indirect supply of arms or related materials to the individuals and entities, according to the resolution.

Terrorism is the enemy of all mankind," Liu Jieyi, China's ambassador to the UN and Security Council president for July, said while issuing the sanctions on Thursday.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/388301-unsc-sanctions-individuals-entities-linked-to-isis-al-qaeda

Pakistan Created Terror Groups To Check India And Afghanistan: Former US Diplomats

Pakistan Created Terror Groups To Check India And Afghanistan: Former US Diplomats
Pakistan Created Terror Groups To Check India And Afghanistan: Former US Diplomats

Pakistan Created Terror Groups To Check India And Afghanistan: Former US Diplomats
Pakistan Created Terror Groups To Check India And Afghanistan: Former US Diplomats

Pakistan created terror groups such as the Taliban, the Haqqani network and the Lashkar-e-Taiba to keep India "off balance" and protect Islamabad's interests in war-torn Afghanistan, according to former US diplomats and officials.

William Milam, a former US ambassador to Pakistan, and Philip Reiner, a former senior director for South Asia at the National Security Council during the Obama administration, said Pakistan's notorious spy agency, the ISI, continues to protect and assist these groups, according to The Cipher Brief.

The online intelligence news and analysis portal on Thursday carried interviews and opinion pieces deciphering the "double game" of the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI).

Milan told the portal that Pakistan has "no interest in a peaceful Afghanistan that would be under the influence of its arch enemy India and feels keenly the need for a proxy to protect its interests there.

We know that Pakistan was present at the creation of the Taliban in the mid-1990s and gave them much support in their fight to take over the country. And we know that the Haqqani network, which is allied with the Afghan Taliban, has become a good substitute proxy," he said.

Milam said the argument that the ISI supports hostile groups such as the Haqqani network, the Taliban, and the Lashkar-e-Taiba are generally believed by Western experts to be correct "but evidence for them is all highly-classified and held closely.

As for the Leshkar-e-Taiba, it is a reminder that Pakistan still sees India as its primary existential threat and still relies on proxies to keep India off balance.

A virulently anti-Indian extremist organisation, Leshkar-e-Taiba serves as one proxy. Inside India, in the last several years, it has carried out very serious raids which appear to have had ISI help. Could they have been rogue ISI units? We don't know)," he said.

Milam was US ambassador to Pakistan from 1998 until 2001.

According to The Cipher Brief, despite denials from senior Pakistani officials, many experts agree that the ISI continues to protect and assist the three US-designated terrorist groups, as part of its strategy to keep Afghanistan unstable and advance its ambitions in the Kashmir region.

In an Op-ed for the portal, Reiner wrote that ISI's role over time has included brutal suppression of anti-state rhetoric, fomenting insurgency, providing illicit channels for drug smuggling, acquiring nuclear weapons components, and developing proxy outfits to splinter domestic political parties.

The primary argument made by Pakistani Generals is that due to historic and growing disparities with India in the conventional military balance, these proxy groups are essential for keeping India off-balance, as well as for ensuring that Afghanistan does not become a Western-aligned and India-dominated neighbour encircling the Pakistanis," he wrote.

According to him, since 9/11, the ISI has assisted in taking down a number of al-Qaeda leaders, but it has at the same time allowed safe passage for other terrorists, permitting India-focused terror groups to remain active, and ensuring that the Afghan Taliban could regroup and become a more effective and equipped fighting force than ever before.

The US has found Pakistan to be a partner and an adversary at the same time," the former White House official said.

Pakistan's double game is clearly illustrated by the ISI and its role," Reiner said.

According to Bennett Seftel, the deputy director of analysis at the online portal, the ISI exerts a strong grip on Pakistan's national security apparatus. It pulls strings behind the scenes to dominate Pakistani's foreign and domestic policies.

Many Americans are wary of the ISI, accusing it of providing safe havens to the Haqqani network and Taliban, which are responsible for many US and allied deaths in Afghanistan," Seftel said.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/388300-pakistan-created-terror-groups-to-check-india-and-afghanistan-former-us-diplomats

US Will Not Pay Pakistan For Military Reimbursements: Pentagon

US Will Not Pay Pakistan For Military Reimbursements: Pentagon
US Will Not Pay Pakistan For Military Reimbursements: Pentagon

The Pentagon will not make the remaining military reimbursements to Pakistan for fiscal year 2016 after U. S.

US Will Not Pay Pakistan For Military Reimbursements: Pentagon
US Will Not Pay Pakistan For Military Reimbursements: Pentagon

The Pentagon will not make the remaining military reimbursements to Pakistan for fiscal year 2016 after U. S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told Congress Islamabad had not taken sufficient action against the Haqqani network, a U. S. official said on Friday.

The funds could not be released to the Government of Pakistan at this time because the secretary could not certify that Pakistan has taken sufficient action against the Haqqani Network per the requirement in the FY 2016 National Defense Authorization Act," Adam Stump, a Pentagon spokesman, told Reuters.

The decision comes as President Donald Trump's administration is exploring potentially hardening its approach toward Pakistan to crack down on militants launching strikes in neighbouring Afghanistan.

This decision does not prejudge the conclusions of the White House review of South Asia strategy, which is still ongoing," Stump said.

Relations between the two countries have been frayed over the past decade, with U. S. officials frustrated by what they term Islamabad's unwillingness to act against Islamist groups such as the Afghan Taliban and the Haqqani network.

This is not the first time the Pentagon has decided not to make military reimbursements. Last year, the Pentagon withheld $300 million in reimbursements.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/388298-us-will-not-pay-pakistan-for-military-reimbursements-pentagon

Soldier Killed, Another Injured In Pakistan Firing On LoC

Soldier Killed, Another Injured In Pakistan Firing On LoC
Soldier Killed, Another Injured In Pakistan Firing On LoC

An Indian soldier was killed and another was injured in Pakistan firing on the Line of Control (LoC) Friday in Jammu and Kashmir's Jammu district, defence sources said.

Soldier Killed, Another Injured In Pakistan Firing On LoC
Soldier Killed, Another Injured In Pakistan Firing On LoC

An Indian soldier was killed and another was injured in Pakistan firing on the Line of Control (LoC) Friday in Jammu and Kashmir's Jammu district, defence sources said.

According to the sources, Pakistan army violated ceasefire by resorting to unprovoked firing across the LoC in Chhamb sector at 6. 05 p. m.

One soldier identified as rifleman Jaidrath was killed while another rifleman identified as Sachin Kumar was injured," a source said, adding Indian troops were "effectively and strongly retaliating".

The sources said Pakistan army initiated firing from Pimpal border outpost on their side of the LoC, while the Indian soldiers killed or injured were deployed at Goga-2 border outpost on the Indian side in Bhattal area of Chhamb sector.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/388299-soldier-killed-another-injured-in-pakistan-firing-on-loc

Navy Lacks Institutional Framework To Deal With Safety: CAG

Navy Lacks Institutional Framework To Deal With Safety: CAG
Navy Lacks Institutional Framework To Deal With Safety: CAG

Navy Lacks Institutional Framework To Deal With Safety: CAG
Navy Lacks Institutional Framework To Deal With Safety: CAG

Indian Navy's ships and submarines were involved in 38 accidents between 2007-08 and 2015-16, adversely affecting the operational preparedness of the force, the Comptroller and Auditor General said in a report today.

The auditor said the accidents were primarily attributable to fire, explosion and flooding, adding the Navy had no institutionalised framework to deal with safety since its inception.

The report, tabled in the Parliament, said a dedicated organisation for dealing with safety issues was setup by the Indian Navy in 2014. However, it awaits government's sanction.

The auditor said the loss of a ship and submarine adversely affects the operational preparedness of the Navy as acquisition of new ships and submarines takes more than eight to 10 years.

It is, therefore, imperative that Navy maintains its assets free from accidents during peacetime evolution.

Between 2007-08 and 2015-16, Indian Navy ships and submarines were involved in 38 accidents, primarily attributable to fire, explosion, flooding," the CAG said.

The CAG also observed that the inventory control mechanism in the Navy was deficient and that laid down timeline for processing of indents was not adhered to leading to cascading effect in procurement of stores.

The also found that the Navy, while placing the order for procurement of four aero-engines for two helicopters damaged in an accident, did not take into consideration one helicopter which was declared 'Beyond Economical Repairs' before the conclusion of the contract.

It said the lapse in decision making process resulted in unproductive expenditure of Rs 16. 62 crore on the procurement of three excess aero-engines.

The CAG also said that non-availability of the defence systems on-board the fleet tankers, since their delivery in 2011, rendered them vulnerable to external threats.

Further, non-linking of payment with the supply/installation of vital defence systems for two fleet tankers, resulted in premature payment of Rs 26. 73 crore to the foreign vendor.

The CAG said the UH-3H fleet of helicopters, procured as an integral part of Landing Platform Deck, was unable to maintain the desired levels of serviceability in six out of seven years of its operations since commissioning.

It said non-existence of dedicated depot level maintenance facilities and non-availability of spares adversely impacted the maintenance of the fleet.

Further, Navy continues to be dependent on the foreign repair agency for maintenance, servicing and logistics issues due to lack of training of Naval personnel," the CAG observed.

In another finding, the CAG said non-availability of a critical flight safety equipment on board the Indian Navy's and Coast Guard's aircraft, has impacted their safe operation for the past 12 years.

The situation would persist for another four years due to asynchronous timelines for delivery of the equipment and its installation on board the aircraft.

Further, failure to take cognisance of de-induction of one of the aircraft fleet, resulted in excess procurement of ten equipment worth Rs 5. 58 crore," the CAG said.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/388297-navy-lacks-institutional-framework-to-deal-with-safety-cag

29 IAF Aircraft Have Crashed Since Last Five Years: Govt

29 IAF Aircraft Have Crashed Since Last Five Years: Govt
29 IAF Aircraft Have Crashed Since Last Five Years: Govt

During the last five financial years (2012-13 to 2016- 17) and the current year (up to July 18), 29 fighter jets including five Sukhoi-30 and three trainer have crashed.

Twenty-nine aircraft of the Indian Air Force have crashed due to technical defects and human error over the last five years, the government said today.

29 IAF Aircraft Have Crashed Since Last Five Years: Govt
29 IAF Aircraft Have Crashed Since Last Five Years: Govt

During the last five financial years (2012-13 to 2016- 17) and the current year (up to July 18), 29 fighter jets including five Sukhoi-30 and three trainer have crashed.

Twenty-nine aircraft of the Indian Air Force have crashed due to technical defects and human error over the last five years, the government said today.

Subhash Bhamre, Minister of State in the Defence Ministry, said every aircraft accident in the IAF is investigated by a Court of Inquiry (CoI) to ascertain the cause of the accident and the recommendations of the completed COIs are implemented.

During the last five financial years (2012-13 to 2016- 17) and the current year (upto July 18), 29 fighter jets including five Sukhoi-30 and three trainer have crashed. Technical defects and human error were the main causes of the accidents," Bhamre said in a written response to a question in the Lok Sabha.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/388296-29-iaf-aircraft-have-crashed-since-last-five-years-govt

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