PAK SCAN: LoC Violations 'Highly Unprofessional And Unethical', DGMO Tells Indian Counterpart

PAK SCAN: LoC Violations 'Highly Unprofessional And Unethical', DGMO Tells Indian Counterpart

Pakistan has conveyed it to India that the “deliberate targeting of innocent civilians” along the line of control by Indian forces was “highly unprofessional and unethical”, the military’s media wing said on Saturday.

PAK SCAN: LoC Violations 'Highly Unprofessional And Unethical', DGMO Tells Indian Counterpart

Pakistan has conveyed it to India that the “deliberate targeting of innocent civilians” along the line of control by Indian forces was “highly unprofessional and unethical”, the military’s media wing said on Saturday.

According to a statement issued by the Inter-Services Public Relations, Pakistan’s Director General Military Operations (DGMO) made "an unscheduled hotline contact" with his Indian counterpart and recorded protest against the targeting of civilians [by Indian forces] in Nezapir, Chirikot and Battal sectors along the LoC.

Such provocations are causing loss of innocent civilian lives and are potentially dangerous to invoke an unbearable response,” the ISPR said.

In September, the apex body for civil-military coordination on national security matters had vowed to defend Pakistan against all forms of external aggression, placing a particular emphasis on countering the aggressive stance adopted by neighbouring India.

The National Security Committee (NSC), Chaired by Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi, had expressed deep concern over repeated ceasefire violations by India along the LoC, which had resulted in the loss of several innocent lives.

The heavily militarised LoC that splits the disputed Himalayan region of Kashmir has been witnessing cross-border shelling for quite some time, in sheer disregard of a November 2003 truce agreement. The ceasefire violations mostly culminate in civilian casualties.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/416067-pak-scan-loc-violations-highly-unprofessional-and-unethical-dgmo-tells-indian-counterpart

Israel’s Titanic Eight-Nation Air Force Exercise Concludes

Israel’s Titanic Eight-Nation Air Force Exercise Concludes

In this photo released by the Hellenic Air Force, two Greek F-16 fighter jets and a USAF F-15E Strike Eagles, based at Lakenheath airbase in England, fly past the 2,880-meter Rio-Antirrio Bridge in southern Greece, on Wednesday, April 13, 2016. The U. S.

Israel’s Titanic Eight-Nation Air Force Exercise Concludes

In this photo released by the Hellenic Air Force, two Greek F-16 fighter jets and a USAF F-15E Strike Eagles, based at Lakenheath airbase in England, fly past the 2,880-meter Rio-Antirrio Bridge in southern Greece, on Wednesday, April 13, 2016. The U. S.

The largest air exercises ever held in the history of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) wrapped up on Friday. Blue Flag, an eight-nation war game contested in the skies of southern Israel, set numerous records - including largest aerial war game of 2017.

France, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, Poland and the US joined the Israeli Air Force for mock battles over Ovda air base, just a few miles north of the resort town of Eilat and the Red Sea. More than 1,200 people took part in the exercises, along with 61 aircraft flying hundreds of sorties.

Together, the eight nations made up the country of Falcon Land, waging war against their hated enemies Nowhere Land — played by a squadron of IAF F-16 fighter jets.

In a statement, IAF top dog Maj. Gen. Amikam Norkin said that the drill was meant to help prepare the participating militaries for operations in the mutable, complex political and military landscape of the Middle East. Countries in the Middle East are constantly changing, with new actors and new organizations, and we need to understand how to deal with each one of them," he said.

If we wish to influence the reality that we will see a decade from now, we must prepare together to create common solutions and build effective international programs," Norkin went on to say. He added that hosting the drill was "undoubtedly an honor for the IDF and for Israel.

The statement added that the exercise had three purposes: to strengthen diplomatic ties between the participants, to expose the various air forces to different tactical doctrines and techniques and improve military cooperation.

Blue Flag 2017 was the third biennial event, and each exercise has been exponentially larger than the last. The first exercise involved American, Israeli and Italian pilots, while the second included those three nations along with Greece and Poland. Italy brought five Tornado jets while Greece, Poland and the US brought 18 F-16s between the three of them.

This year's newcomers included France, Germany and India, major gets as all three are among the top 10 largest defense spenders in the world. The French Air Force, which hasn't been seen over the skies of Israel since 1956, brought five Mirage 2000AD fighter jets. India brought a C-130J Hercules transport plane and a retinue of special forces soldiers to man it.

The Luftwaffe came along with a half-dozen Eurofighters. The participation of the Germans was a subject of some controversy, as it would be the first time since World War I that German planes had been seen over the territory.

In this Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017 photo, An Israeli soldier looks at an F-15s of the Knights of the twin tail 133 squadron takes off from Ovda airbase near Eilat, southern Israel,during the 2017 Blue Flag exercise. Israel's military is holding the largest ever air drill of its kind with pilots from eight countries simulating combat scenarios. It said Thursday that Germany, India and France are taking part for the first time in the two week drill codenamed blue flag, held every two years.

Compounding the issue is that the symbol of the modern Luftwaffe is the Iron Cross: a symbol of Germany for centuries, but also heavily associated with the Nazis whose highest military honor was an Iron Cross medal.

Seeing the Luftwaffe airplanes [adorned with Iron Crosses] entering our hangars — it's something I'll always remember," said Col. Itamar, commander of Ovda air base, at the beginning of the exercises. It's sensitive. It's emotional. The past can't be changed.

However, Itamar added, the two nations have been able to put history behind them and work to their mutual benefit.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/416068-israel-s-titanic-eight-nation-air-force-exercise-concludes

Another Youth Shuns Terrorism, Returns Home

Another Youth Shuns Terrorism, Returns Home

Another video has surfaced in which family of a youth form Kaprin in Shopian district has appealed to their son, Ashiq Hussain Bhat, to return home.

An unnamed youth, who had joined militant ranks, today shunned the path of violence and returned home in south Kashmir following an appeal by his parents, police said.

Another Youth Shuns Terrorism, Returns Home

Another video has surfaced in which family of a youth form Kaprin in Shopian district has appealed to their son, Ashiq Hussain Bhat, to return home.

An unnamed youth, who had joined militant ranks, today shunned the path of violence and returned home in south Kashmir following an appeal by his parents, police said.

The development comes three days after footballer- turned-militant Majid Khan laid down arms and returned home following an appeal by his mother which was doing rounds of social media last week.

A police spokesman said, "Responding to the appeal of parents one more youth, who had joined militants, returns home in South Kashmir".

He refused to give details of the youth, saying the security and safety of the individual concerned was paramount.

Meanwhile, another video has surfaced in which family of a youth form Kaprin in Shopian district has appealed to their son, Ashiq Hussain Bhat, to return home.

It was not immediately clear whether the youth to shun violence today was Bhat.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/416066-another-youth-shuns-terrorism-returns-home

Pakistan Seeks Polish Assault Rifles

Pakistan Seeks Polish Assault Rifles

A Pakistani delegation visited Poland last week to discuss procurement of some 500,000-800,000 assault rifles in a requirement that could be worth US$2 billion.

Pakistan Seeks Polish Assault Rifles

A Pakistani delegation visited Poland last week to discuss procurement of some 500,000-800,000 assault rifles in a requirement that could be worth US$2 billion.

The potential of the acquisition and transfer of technology related to the production of small arms and ammunition was the main topic of talks between the board member of Maciej Lew-Mirski and the president of the Pakistan Ordnance Factory (POF), PGZ SA said in a statement last Friday.

Pakistan's armed forces have been preparing for a succession of years under the license of G-3 German rifles and Chinese type 56 rifles, modelled on Soviet AK and AKM designs.

This is the first of three such visits to the Polish Armaments Group planned for this year.

The delegation from Pakistan also visited "Łucznik" Arms Factory in Radom, Tarnów Mechanical Plant, MESKO in Skarżysko-Kamienna, and visited the training facility to familiarize with the equipment manufactured by the companies from the PGZ Group and used by the Polish Armed Forces.

Pakistan has a huge demand for small arms, which is linked to the unstable situation in their region. South Asia's arms race and internal threats force the defense industry to expand its capabilities in the field of modern weapons and ammunition.

The PGZ sees great potential in cooperation with Islamabad, not only in the field of small arms but also in other areas of Pakistan's modernization program. Pakistan's defense budget for 2017-2018 is close to $ 9 billion, so it is definitely a fight,” said Maciej Lew-Mirski, a member of the board of PGZ SA.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/416065-pakistan-seeks-polish-assault-rifles

India, China And North Korea All Want To Go To The Moon. Here's Why

India, China And North Korea All Want To Go To The Moon. Here's Why

No human has been to the Moon since 1972 and only 12 people have ever done it—all of them American men. But that list could soon be getting a lot longer.

Why the Moon? Haven’t we already been there, done that? Well, yes. But now there are new reasons motivating countries to reach the Moon.

India, China And North Korea All Want To Go To The Moon. Here's Why

No human has been to the Moon since 1972 and only 12 people have ever done it—all of them American men. But that list could soon be getting a lot longer.

Why the Moon? Haven’t we already been there, done that? Well, yes. But now there are new reasons motivating countries to reach the Moon.

Human and other missions to the Moon are planned by India, China and Russia, as well as Japan and Europe. South Korea and North Korea are also looking toward the Moon.

Even NASA seems to be getting its mojo back, recently announcing a revamped vision for a Deep Space Gateway that includes a port of call at the Moon en route to Mars and beyond. Elon Musk has also called for a Moon base.

Private companies are vying for a slice of the Moon pie, lured by Google’s multi-million dollar XPRIZE that challenges entrants to develop low-cost methods for robotic space exploration.

A space race of sorts seems to back on in earnest, for five reasons.

In the past and still now, one reason that space attracts interest and investment is that humans seem driven to explore and push the limits, physically and viscerally.

But space also acts as a unifying force, providing a clear vision that pushes technology and innovation forward.

After several decades of relative neglect, space exploration is again seen as driving technology, inspiring engagement with science and engineering, and creating national pride. The program at the recent International Astronautical Congress in Adelaide captured that sentiment.

These motivators are seen as especially important by emerging economies like India, China and Russia, which means that more established players like Europe and the U. S. have to work harder keep up.

The recent announcement that Australia will have a space agency is expected to create new opportunities for this country.

Paradoxically, exploration of the Moon builds both international cooperation and competition.

Even if they don’t have their own space program, countries can develop instruments to fly on spacecraft that are built and launched by other nations. For example, India’s Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft carried instruments from Sweden, Germany, the U. Bulgaria, and the U. S. to the Moon. This helps mesh economies and provides strong motivation to keep the peace.

Economic and geopolitical competition occurs because the Moon is seen as unclaimed territory. No country is allowed to own the Moon, at least according to a 1967 U. N. Treaty that has agreement from over 100 countries.

Nonetheless, there are incentives to place a claim on the Moon. For example, helium-3 (an isotope of the element helium) is abundant on the Moon, but rare on Earth. It is a potential fuel for nuclear fusion, a potentially unlimited and non-polluting source of energy. China, in particular, has stated a strong interest in lunar helium-3.

The situation appears similar to that of Antarctica in the 1950s, when the continent was subdivided by the 12 countries that had active scientific programs in the region at the time. Sending a spacecraft to the Moon—even if it fails prematurely like India’s Chandrayaan-1—may provide a compelling case for recognition if the Moon were ever to be carved up into zones of research and economic development.

Russia, China, Japan, Europe and the U. S. landed (or crashed) spacecraft on the Moon in the decades after Apollo.

The distant blue Earth is seen above the Moon's limb, in this handout picture taken by the Apollo 8 crew forty-five years ago, on December 24, 1968, courtesy of NASA.

Growing space agencies need successful missions, and the Moon is a tempting target. Radio communication over the relatively short distance between the Earth and Moon (238,850 miles) is almost instantaneous (one to two seconds). Between Earth and Mars, two-way communication times can be the better part of an hour.

The low gravity and lack of an atmosphere on the Moon also simplifies operations for orbiters and landers.

The Russian Luna missions showed that it is technically feasible to apply robotics to bring samples from the Moon to Earth.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/416064-india-china-and-north-korea-all-want-to-go-to-the-moon-here-s-why

Panasonic Rugged Devices Ideal For Defence, Says Eriko Okuda, Global Sales Head

Panasonic Rugged Devices Ideal For Defence, Says Eriko Okuda, Global Sales Head

Panasonic Rugged Devices Ideal For Defence, Says Eriko Okuda, Global Sales HeadJapanese tech major Panasonic leads the rugged computing devices segment in India with a 65% market share.
Panasonic Rugged Devices Ideal For Defence, Says Eriko Okuda, Global Sales Head

Panasonic Rugged Devices Ideal For Defence, Says Eriko Okuda, Global Sales Head Japanese tech major Panasonic leads the rugged computing devices segment in India with a 65% market share. It expects India to account for 5% of its global revenues in the niche rugged devices segment over the next 2-3 years, driven by strong demand from defence and manufacturing verticals. India is a strategic market for us which has been continually witnessing double digit growth over the years,” says Eriko Okuda, global sales head, Mobility Solutions Business Division, Panasonic. Old bulky laptops present safety concerns and portability issues. Our rugged notebooks are ideal for government agencies such as police, emergency services, defence, field service workers, enabling them to do more with their computing devices,” she tells Sudhir Chowdhary in a recent interaction.

Tell us something about the company’s rugged computing portfolio. Whom is it targeted at?

The Panasonic Toughbook (laptop) and Toughpad (tablet) segment comprises rugged laptops and tablets that are engineered with enterprise-grade security and can withstand drops, spills, dust and grime to perform in the harshest environments. The segment is in its seventh year of operations here in India; it commands a market share of 65% and has 10 products across its product portfolio in the country. Currently our products are dominant in five verticals—transportation and logistics, public safety, manufacturing, utility and hospitality. Lately we have been focusing on expanding the sectoral horizons of our products, and hence are now venturing into new categories such as pharmaceuticals and retail.

What is the global market share of rugged products?

Our global market share as of financial year 2016-17 is 52-53%. The segment leads the category across the continent of Europe and parts of North America with the likes of NYPD (New York Police Department) and British Airways making use of our rugged technological offerings.

What kind of traction do you see for your products in India? How has the business been here?

The rugged product segment is a predominantly small market in India of almost Rs 150 crore. Panasonic India leads the category with a 65% market share and are the prime choice for customers looking to enhance their business operations. Last year we launched the world’s first rugged detachable notebook for business, CF 20, which did very well in the market. Since setting up base in India seven years ago, the Toughbook and Toughpad category has thrived, experiencing almost a double digit growth year after year. We have supplied our Toughpads to different state police such as that of Uttar Pradesh wherein we supplied 3,500 Toughpads to UP PCR vans under the state government’s UP 100 project. The state police of Bangalore was also a recipient of 222 Toughpads, alongside Rajasthan and Kerala wherein we have undertaken similar installations.

What is the contribution of Toughbook and Toughpad’s India revenues in the global context?

India is still a developing market for the category and currently contributes less than 5% to the global Toughbook and Toughpad segment. However, we are looking at contributions from the segment to touch 5% in the next 2-3 years.

There are a lot of initiatives undertaken by the government such as Smart Cities, Digital India and other e-governance initiatives. What type of opportunities do you see under these, especially in the areas of manufacturing and construction?

In its efforts to create a digitised connected network, we have already seized upon a few opportunities presented by the government. The installation of Toughpads in police vans across the states of Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Kerala and Karnataka is a testimony of that. We are also seeing an increase in demand from fire departments who are looking at similar installations of Toughpad for their moving vehicles as well. Moreover, companies in the manufacturing sector have already been using our products because of our unique offerings such as a built-in bar code reader and a long battery life with swappable batteries. A lot of companies have made use of our services, especially automotive companies who are not only using it at their services centres but at their plant locations as well. The product has revolutionised the workability aspect for the workforce, as it has been able to successfully unify different characteristics such as bar code reader, wireless capability, enduring battery life and most importantly, rugged nature into a singular product.

What are the business prospects you see from the Indian market?

India is a strategic market for us which has been continually witnessing double digit growth over the years. By the end of FY 2016-17 we saw the Toughbook and Toughpad segment grow by 15-20%, with revenues close to Rs 80 crore. Within the category, India is the second largest market in the Asia Pacific region, second only to Australia. Continuing on its excellent growth rate, we expect the segment to account for about 5% of the global revenues in the next 2-3 years. Given the unique innovative capability of the product, and an increase in government-led initiatives from both central and state authorities, the business viabilities in India are huge. Elaborating on the same, we have supplied Toughpads to scientists working for the Geological Survey of India, which is enabling them to use the device for both computing and GPS related tasks. Given its ability to work without a 4G or a 2G connection as it works via direct satellite connection, it gives the scientists an option to go and work seamlessly in remote areas outdoor.

What is the product’s battery life like since power in India is a big issue?

Our products in the category essentially work on three battery options: Small battery which has a life of upto 10 hours, large battery which has a life of upto 20 hours and hot swap battery. The concept on which the hot swap battery option works on is that of individual charging capability which is independent of the device. This option is well-suited for manufacturing facilities which work round the clock in different shifts; with the swappable battery on charge the device is not compromised and continues to work. Once the battery within the device drains out, it is put on standby while the charged battery is put in and work is carried out again from there. This way, one device operates for 24 hours with a hassle-free charging option.

What are the challenges that you are currently facing in India?

Given the characteristics of the hardware which makes our Toughbooks and Toughpads rugged and impervious to harsh conditions, there is a manufacturing cost involved in incorporating those elements into a product alongside other technologies. This process is essentially the one which pushes the pricing to the higher end of the spectrum, which is one of the challenges we face in the country.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/416063-panasonic-rugged-devices-ideal-for-defence-says-eriko-okuda-global-sales-head

China's Bid To Encircle India Boomerangs

China's Bid To Encircle India Boomerangs

China's Bid To Encircle India Boomerangs

The second was the discussions held between India, Japan, the US, and Australia on the sidelines of the East Asia Summit in Manila to give concrete shape to what was till now a decade-old idea of setting up a four-nation security quadrilateral. The unstated objective of both the Conclave and the Quadrilateral dialogue was to meet the increasing Chinese challenge in the IOR.

The importance of the IOR becomes obvious when it is borne in mind that it has 65 per cent of the world's oil reserves, 35 per cent of the world's natural gas reserves and huge quantities of mineral resources. The Indian Navy started the planned expansion of its fleet strength during the UPA regime. India already possesses one of the largest navies in the world and once the current program for naval development has been implemented, India will be one of the top-five most powerful navies on the planet.

Indeed, for quite a long time, the Navy's requirements did not get the priority they deserved. But now things have changed. Enormous resources have been allocated for the rapid expansion of the Navy and if everything goes on schedule then by 2030 India may become the second largest navy in Asia. It will have three aircraft carriers that can deploy 110 to 120 aircraft. It will also have fifty to seventy corvettes, frigates and destroyers and some thirty submarines, including four to six nuclear submarines capable of launching ballistic missiles from underwater (SLBMs).

Corvettes are anti-submarine ships. Their job is to ferret out and destroy submarines. It is possible to use carbon fibre composite material in building corvettes. This reduces the weight of the ship by nearly 30 per cent. With reduced engine noise, their 'stealth' quality has also improved considerably.

From the strategic point of view, there are nine 'choke points' in the IOR, which are important to India. These include the straits of Malacca, Hormuz and Bab-el-Mandeb, the Cape of Good Hope and, of course, the Suez Canal. Some time ago, China set up a naval base in Djibouti in eastern Africa, close to the Gulf of Aden. India's taking over of the Chabahar port from Iran will counter the threat from the Chinese naval base in Djibouti.

In any future armed conflict with China it is the Indian Ocean rather than the High Himalayas that may become the main arena of battle. The Indian Navy is preparing itself to meet any eventuality in the Indian Ocean even as China's neighbours are having more and more misgivings about the intentions of Beijing. It is not merely China's military strength but also its economic muscle that is causing them anxiety.

Chinese companies finance projects in the neighbouring countries liberally but the loans come with very rigorous terms and conditions. Quite often the debtor country is unable to repay the debt and has to sell the ownership of the projects in part or full to liquidate the loan. Sri Lanka had to sell its equity in the Hambantota port to the Chinese companies as repayment.

Very recently, Pakistan has said 'No' to Chinese assistance to build its ambitious 4,500 MW Daimer-Bhasa Hydel project in Pakistan-Occupied Kashmir. The $14 billion project is part of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) which runs through PoK. India has strongly objected to the CPEC because it violates India's sovereignty as PoK is an integral part of the country.

Pakistan had earlier approached the Asian Development Bank (ADB) for financial assistance for the project but the ADB turned down the request because it is located in a 'disputed' territory. Now Pakistan has declined to accept Chinese assistance for the project because of the stringent conditions attached. Pakistan Power and Water Development Authority chairman Muzammil Hussain has said Pakistan will do the project on its own as it finds the Chinese conditions "against our interests".

The same story has been repeated in Nepal. A Kathmandu report quoting Energy Minister Kamal Thapa a few days ago said Nepal had scrapped the $2. 5 billion dollar agreement with the Chinese company Gezhouba to build the Budhi Gandak Hydel project, which would have become the country's biggest hydro-power plant, ostensibly because the agreement was 'irregular'.

China wanted to encircle India with its 'String of Pearls' policy. Now it is finding itself getting isolated from its neighbours. If the Goa Maritime Conclave decisions start getting implemented and the Quad project turns from the conceptual stage to take a concrete form, China will find itself arrayed against the combined strength of a number of countries.

India-Vietnam defence cooperation is increasing, much to Beijing's displeasure. After signing the Missile Technology Control Regime, India can develop the supersonic Brahmos missiles with a far longer range than the present 290 km. India and Russia are already developing a 600-km range version of the Brahmos. After signing the MTCR there is no bar to prevent India from selling the improved version to friendly countries like Vietnam. China may soon find that its policy of encircling India is boomeranging on itself.

Views expressed are of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of IDN.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/416062-china-s-bid-to-encircle-india-boomerangs

Boost To Make In India Program: DRDO To Develop Man-Portable Anti-Tank Guided Indigenously

Boost To Make In India Program: DRDO To Develop Man-Portable Anti-Tank Guided Indigenously

The $500 million deal was scrapped after consideration was made stating that importing Anti-Tank Guided Missile (ATGM) would surely impact the indigenous development of the weapon system by DRDO.

Boost To Make In India Program: DRDO To Develop Man-Portable Anti-Tank Guided Indigenously

The $500 million deal was scrapped after consideration was made stating that importing Anti-Tank Guided Missile (ATGM) would surely impact the indigenous development of the weapon system by DRDO. What's interesting is that before almost signing a deal with Israel, India had also rejected an offer from US-based Raytheon-Lockheed Martin for Javelin ATG. The missiles which will now be produced and developed by the DRDO are the 3rd generation Spike MR missiles. Being latest in technology, with Spike MR Missile the army just has to set the target fire the missile and forget it.

Coming out as a major boost to ‘Make in India’, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) has scrapped the $500 million deal with its dear friend, Israel. ncelling the deal, the MoD has asked the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) to indigenously develop and produce the anti-tank missiles. Earlier, India was in talks to sign a deal with Israel to make the Man-Portable Anti-Tank Guided Missile (MPATGM) for the Indian Army indigenously.

The deal which was being seen as increasing defence cooperation between the two nations was expected to be signed after the price negotiations with the manufacturer — Rafael Advanced Defence Systems of Israel, were completed in 2016. Following the $500 million deal talks between India and Israel, Rafael Advanced Defence Systems had gone into a joint venture with Kalyani group for missile production in India. The venture which is based near Hyderabad was inaugurated in August 2017.

According to a report by Indian Express, the $500 million deal was scrapped after consideration was made stating that importing Anti-Tank Guided Missile (ATGM) would surely impact the indigenous development of the weapon system by DRDO. What’s interesting is that before almost signing a deal with Israel, India had also rejected an offer from US-based Raytheon-Lockheed Martin for Javelin ATG. Backing the decision of the defence ministry, a source said that DRDO had successfully produced the Nag and Anamika ATGMs in past and is confident of providing the Indian Army with MPATGM within the time period of 3-4 years.

Even though the move is aimed at boosting the ‘Make in India’ scheme by the Modi government, some say that this retraction of a proposal is a major blow to the Indian Army in terms of modernisation. e missiles which will now be produced and developed by the DRDO are the 3rd generation Spike MR missiles. Being latest in technology, with Spike MR Missile the army just has to set the target fire the missile and forget it. The ATGM come with a range of around 2. 5 km and can operate both in day and night. On the other hand, the Indian army currently uses the second generation anti-tank guided missiles. The missiles currently in use are Konkurs and Milan 2T, both do not have night-fighting capabilities.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/416060-boost-to-make-in-india-program-drdo-to-develop-man-portable-anti-tank-guided-indigenously

Indian Industry Should Draw Up 50-Yr Plan For Defence Supplies: Defence Minister

Indian Industry Should Draw Up 50-Yr Plan For Defence Supplies: Defence Minister

Union Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Saturday urged the industry to chart out a plan for the next 50 years and work with the armed forces.

Speaking at an interactive meeting organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), Sitharaman said Tamil Nadu-based companies should plan ahead in meeting the demands of the defence forces.

Indian Industry Should Draw Up 50-Yr Plan For Defence Supplies: Defence Minister

Union Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Saturday urged the industry to chart out a plan for the next 50 years and work with the armed forces.

Speaking at an interactive meeting organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), Sitharaman said Tamil Nadu-based companies should plan ahead in meeting the demands of the defence forces.

The Defence Minister said the central government will remove the hurdles in domestic defence manufacturing.

Sitharaman said the Tamil Nadu Industry Minister M C Sampath had mooted the idea of creating an aerospace cluster and defence parks.

Sitharaman said she has asked CII officials to hold discussions with the state government and chart out a plan.

Questioned about Tamil Nadu Governor Banwarilal Purohit visiting districts and meeting officials, Sitharaman said there was nothing wrong in that.

On the alleged firing at Indian fishermen by the Coast Guard recently, Sitharaman said the truth would come out on the completion of an inquiry.

Sitharaman said the talks for the purchase of French Rafale fighter jets began in the year 2000 and the United Progressive Alliance (UPA) government did not take any concrete decisions after holding negotiations between 2004-2013.

She said it was only Prime Minister Narendra Modi who boldly decided to sign the deal to buy 36 Rafale fighter jets.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/416061-indian-industry-should-draw-up-50-yr-plan-for-defence-supplies-defence-minister

Army’s Air Defence Deal Hangs Fire

Army’s Air Defence Deal Hangs Fire

The Army’s attempts to upgrade its short range air defence systems continues to hang fire with the tender for Very Short Range Air Defence (VSHORAD) systems stuck again after recent re-trials.

Re-trials have been completed and two of the three contenders failed to comply with the requirements.

Army’s Air Defence Deal Hangs Fire

The Army’s attempts to upgrade its short range air defence systems continues to hang fire with the tender for Very Short Range Air Defence (VSHORAD) systems stuck again after recent re-trials.

Re-trials have been completed and two of the three contenders failed to comply with the requirements. The deal is before general staff evaluation and a technical oversight committee is being constituted to look into it,” a source said.

The Army has been attempting to avoid a single vendor situation arising out of non-compliance of some vendors, which would result in cancellation of the tender as per the Defence Procurement Procedure (DPP).

The Request for Information (RFI) was issued in 2010. Three companies made it to the trials — MBDA of France, Rosoboronexport of Russia and SAAB of Sweden. Four rounds of trials have been held, with the last one in May this year.

However, last year the Army called for re-confirmatory trials after certain non-compliances by the vendors from the given specifications. Four round of trials have been held so far the last one in May this year.

The VSHORAD tender is intended for the Army and Navy and estimated over $5 bn for 5,175 missiles and 1,276 single and multi-launchers with stipulated technology transfer requirement for Defence Public Sector Undertakings (DPSU).

Early this year, the Defence Ministry cancelled a second air defence tender which was underway for Short Range Surface to Air Missile (SRSAM) worth about ₹12,000-14,000 crore and instead decided to go for two more regiments of the indigenously built Akash systems.

Read more http://theindiansubcontinent.com/defense/item/416058-army-s-air-defence-deal-hangs-fire

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